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Golf has perhaps been acknowledged as the sports of the elite classes of the globe and represents sports enwrapped in style. An addictive sport that is usually a vital part of the life of people associated with it, golf requires time and practice.

The most irritating part of the sports that keeps one striving to get better is the zest to continue one bad shot after another in search of a good one. The idea behind the sport is perpetual endeavor until success is attained. Below we are listing best golf players according to the latest world rankings.

1 – Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods

Eldrick (Tiger) Woods, now 35 years of age, has had an unprecedented career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won 95 tournaments, 71 of those on the PGA Tour, including the 1997, 2001, 2002 and 2005 Masters Tournaments, 1999, 2000, 2006 and 2007 PGA Championships, 2000, 2002, and 2008 U.S. Open Championships, and 2000, 2005 and 2006 Open Championships. With his second Masters victory in 2001, Tiger became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time. He is the career victories leader among active players on the PGA Tour, and is the career money list leader.

Woods holds or shares the record for the low score in relation to par in each of the four major championships. His records are 270 (18-under par) in the 1997 Masters, 272 (12-under par) in the 2000 U.S. Open, 269 (19-under par) in the 2000 Open Championship, and he shares the record of 270 (18-under par) with Bob May in the 2000 PGA Championship, which Tiger won by one stroke in a three-hole playoff.

He is third in PGA Tour career victories, trailing only Sam Snead (82) and Jack Nicklaus (73). Tiger increased his record total on the PGA Tour career money list to $94,157,304 through 2010, and had won $113,602,123 worldwide. In addition to his playing exploits, Woods is busy off the course, too.

2 – Phil Mickelson

Phil Mickelson

Phil Mickelson

In 2004 Ford created an advertising campaign around the tagline, “What will Phil do next?” It got a lot of play in the media and eventually throughout the golf world when Phil Mickelson would hit a shot only he could see or make a decision bystanders couldn’t comprehend or show up at Augusta using two drivers to win the Masters or five wedges in a win at Colonial.

His parents, Phil and Mary, had been asking the same question for more than 30 years. Golf fans started asking it nearly 15 years earlier, when he won a PGA Tour event as a college junior. In 1999 people wondered why he’d allow himself to be “distracted” by a beeper he carried through a U.S. Open while counting both strokes in a championship decided on the last hole and the minutes until his first child was born.

Phil’s favorite courses are Whisper Rock in Scottsdale, AZ, his first design, and Augusta National Golf Club. Phil is the best player in the Masters over the last five years. He won twice, had two thirds and averaged 70.40 per round and won $3,407,800. Phil is the best player in the U.S. Open over the last five years. He had two seconds and a third, averaged 71,25 and earned $1,813, 207.

3 – Padraig Harrington

Padraig Harrington

Padraig Harrington

After a successful amateur career, including winning the Walker Cup with the Great Britain & Ireland team in 1995, Harrington turned professional later that year, joining the European Tour in 1996. Harrington came to professional golf at a relatively late age, having studied accountancy at university; he worked in that profession for a number of years while playing high-standard amateur golf. He was unsure whether to turn professional, initially doubting his skills.

Aside from Tiger Woods, who has won consecutive majors three times (2000, 2002, and 2006), Harrington is the first golfer to win two majors in the same year since Mark O’Meara in 1998 and the first to win consecutive majors in the same year since Nick Price in 1994. Furthermore, aside from Woods, he is the first golfer to win three of six consecutive majors in 25 years, since Tom Watson accomplished the feat in 1983, something that only four other players – Ben Hogan, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Lee Trevino had previously achieved since the modern “Grand Slam” of four majors began to be recognized in the 1950s.

Harrington’s victory in the PGA Championship secured his position as the number one player in Europe, earning him the number one spot in the 2008 European Ryder Cup team under captain Nick Faldo.

4 – Adam Scott

Adam Scott - Golf Player

Adam Scott - Golf Player

Scott’s playing career took off in 2001, his first full year as a professional golfer, when he won the European Tour’s Alfred Dunhill Championship in Johannesburg, South Africa. The following year he recorded two more European Tour victories, at the Qatar Masters and the Scottish PGA Championship.

In 2003, Scott won his fourth European title at the Scandinavian Masters and his first win on the U.S.-based PGA Tour, at the Deutsche Bank Championship. Further PGA Tour successes followed in 2004 at The Players Championship and the Booz Allen Classic. Early in 2005 he won the Nissan Open and reached the top ten of the Official World Golf Rankings for the first time. He has spent over 180 weeks in the top-10 of the rankings.

Scott achieved his best finish at a major championship when he finished in a tie for second place at the 2011 Masters Tournament alongside compatriot Jason Day, two strokes behind the winner Charl Schwartzel. Scott had held the sole lead of the tournament while playing the 71st hole, but four birdies in a row from Schwartzel meant Scott fell short by two strokes. However Scott said afterwards that he could only take positives out of the week and that his putting had never felt so good with the long putter.

5 – Ernie Els

Ernie Els

Ernie Els

Theodore Ernest “Ernie” Els (born 17 October 1969) is a South African professional golfer, who has been one of the top professional players in the world since the mid-1990s. A former World No. 1, he is known as “The Big Easy” due to his imposing physical stature (he stands 1.91 metres [6 feet, 3 inches]) along with his fluid, seemingly effortless golf swing. Among his numerous victories are three major championships: the U.S. Open in 1994 at the Oakmont Country Club and 1997 at the Congressional Country Club, and The Open Championship in 2002 at Muirfield.

Other highlights in Els’ career include topping the 2003 and 2004 European Tour Order of Merit (money list), and winning the World Match Play Championship a record seven times. He is the leading career money winner on the European Tour, and was the first member of the tour to earn over 25 million Euros from European Tour events. He has held the number one spot in the Official World Golf Rankings and holds the record for weeks ranked in the top ten with over 780. Els was elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2010, on his first time on the ballot, and was inducted in May 2011.

6 – Sergio Garcia

Sergio Garcia

Sergio Garcia

García began playing golf at the age of three and was taught by his father, Victor. He was a star player as a junior, winning his club championship at age 12. Four years later, he set a record as the youngest player to make the cut at a European Tour event, the 1995 Turespaña Open Mediterranea. This record was broken by amateur Jason Hak in November 2008 at the UBS Hong Kong Open, beating García’s record by 107 days. Also in 1995, García became the youngest player[3] to win the European Amateur. He followed that with a win in the Boys Amateur Championship in 1997, and in 1998 he won The Amateur Championship.

García turned professional in 1999 after shooting the lowest amateur score in the 1999 Masters Tournament. His first title on the European Tour came in his sixth start as a professional at the Irish Open. He first achieved worldwide prominence with a duel against Tiger Woods in the 1999 PGA Championship, where he eventually finished second. Late in the final round, García hit his most famed shot: with his ball up against a tree trunk and the green hidden from view, he swung hard with his eyes shut and hit a low curving fade that ran up onto the green. As the shot traveled, he sprinted madly into the fairway and then scissor-kick jumped to see the result. Shortly afterwards he became the youngest player ever to compete in the Ryder Cup.

7 – Steve Stricker

Steve Stricker

Steve Stricker

He first joined the PGA Tour in 1994. His first success at the top level came in 1996, when Stricker notched two victories (Kemper Open, Motorola Western Open) and seven top ten finishes on his way to finishing fourth on the 1996 PGA Tour money list. Stricker’s third win came at the 2001 WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship, where he defeated Pierre Fulke 2 and 1 in Australia, to earn the $1,000,000 prize. He won The Barclays tournament on August 26, 2007, ending an 11-year losing span on American soil.

In 1998, Steve Stricker played himself into contention in the final round of the PGA Championship at Sahalee Country Club in Redmond, Washington. Thanks to a back-nine surge, PGA Tour veteran Vijay Singh bested Stricker down the stretch and claimed a two-stroke victory. The runner-up finish remains Stricker’s best result in a major championship.

Stricker has spent 140 weeks in the top-10 of the rankings since 2007.

8 – Geoff Ogilvy

Geoff Ogilvy

Geoff Ogilvy

Ogilvy won his first major championship at the 2006 U.S. Open, becoming the first Australian to win a men’s golf major since Steve Elkington at the 1995 PGA Championship. Ogilvy finished his round with a champion’s flourish, making improbable pars on each of the last two holes. He holed a 30-foot chip shot at the 17th, and then got up-and-down for par at the 18th, dropping a downhill six-footer for his final stroke as all his competitors collapsed around him. Phil Mickelson and Colin Montgomerie needed pars on the final hole to win, or bogeys to tie with Ogilvy, but they ruined their chances by producing double-bogey sixes to give Ogilvy a dramatic win. Jim Furyk needed par to force a playoff but bogeyed the final hole.

This success moved Ogilvy into the top ten of the Official World Golf Rankings for the first time, at Number 8. He reached his highest placing to date on 9 July 2006 when he was ranked Number 7, and he returned to that rank in February 2007 after finishing as runner-up to Henrik Stenson while defending his title at the 2007 WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship. He has spent over 120 weeks in the top-10 of the rankings.

9 – Henrik Stenson

Henrik Stenson

Henrik Stenson

Stenson reached the top 20 of the Official World Golf Rankings in 2006 and the top 10 in 2007. In February 2007, he reached number eight in the rankings following his victory at the Dubai Desert Classic and became the highest ranked European golfer for the first time.

The following week, Stenson then became the first Swede to win one of the World Golf Championships when beating Geoff Ogilvy 2&1 in the final of the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship. This victory took Stenson to the top of the European Order of Merit and also to a high of 5th in the world rankings, which is also the highest a Swedish player has ever been ranked, surpassing Jesper Parnevik’s previous record of reaching seventh place in May 2000.[3] In all, he spent over 90 weeks in the top 10 of the rankings since 2007. These two victories put Stenson in the lead of the 2007 European Tour Order of Merit, but he failed to add to his success over the rest of the season and finished in fourth place.

On 10 May 2009, Stenson won The Players Championship with a dominating final round score of 66 to finish four ahead of Ian Poulter. The win was his first American stroke play victory. This win again brought him to fifth in the Official World Golf Rankings. The following week he moved up to fourth without playing.

10 – Matt Kuchar

Matt Kuchar

Matt Kuchar

Kuchar’s first win on the PGA Tour came at the 2002 Honda Classic; however, by 2006 he was on the Nationwide Tour after failing to earn enough money to qualify for the PGA Tour. He won the Nationwide Tour’s 2006 Henrico County Open and finished 10th on the money list to earn his 2007 PGA Tour card. He retained his card in 2007 by finishing 115th on the money list and again in 2008 by finishing 70th.

Seven years after his first PGA Tour win, Kuchar won for a second time during the 2009 Fall Series at the Turning Stone Resort Championship in a playoff over Vaughn Taylor that concluded on Monday because of the playoff being postponed due to darkness on the previous Sunday.

On August 15, 2010, Kuchar made the U.S. 2010 Ryder Cup team by earning enough points to take the 8th, and last position, awarded on points. At the time Kuchar led the PGA Tour in top-10 finishes for the year, but had not won a tournament in 2010. The winless streak ended at The Barclays on August 29, 2010, which was played at the Ridgewood Country Club in Paramus, New Jersey; Kuchar defeated Martin Laird on the first hole of a sudden death playoff.

Kuchar won the Vardon Trophy and Byron Nelson Award in 2010 for lowest scoring average and the PGA Tour’s Arnold Palmer Award for leading the money list.

Bob On May - 27 - 2011

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